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Pan de Campagne de Provençe

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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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    Posted: 12 January 2013 at 11:51
Country folk and city folk alike, all have a penchant for home baked bread and its delightful aromas. It is a favorite food in the Mediterranean and a necessary fuel.
 
This recipe hails from a tiny village bakery in the town of Cavaillon, Provençe. The addition of rye flour is quite common in numerous French hearty thick loaves, and it provides the flour with a wonderful whole wheat golden brown color and fine texture ...
 
 
Photo Credit: www.lacachina.com
 
Brook had given me some advice and enquired about my recipe, and thus, I decided to post for Brook, Historic Foodie, an old penfriend since Summer 2011.
 
Here is the recipe ...
 
FRENCH COUNTRY BREAD ... PAIN DE CAMPAGNE ...
 
THE STARTER ...
 
1 cup warm water 105 degrees farenheit
1 tblsp. honey
1 envelope dry yeast
1 cup Rye Flour
1 cup + 1 tblsp. Bread Flour
 
THE BREAD ...
 
2 3/4 cups warm water  105 degrees farenheit
1 envelope dry yeast
6 cups Bread flour
3/4 cups Rye flour
1 1/2 tablespoons fine sea salt
 
THE STARTER
 
1) mix water and the honey in a medium sized bowl
2) add the yeast and stir to dissolve
3) let stand until foaming - 8 to 12 mins.
4) add 1/2 cup rye flour and 1/2 cup bread flour; and stir thoroughly to combine
5) mix in enough bread flour to form a shaggy mass that can be worked with hands
6) turn out starter on to a floured work surface of choice ( wood butcher block is what I employ)
7) knead for 3 mins. and add more bread flour if sticky to work
8) sprinkle 1 tblp. bread flour in medium bowl and add the starter dough to the bowl
9) cover with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature overnight ( the starter shall lose shape and spread into a thick batter )
 
THE BREAD
 
1) prepare the dough in a heavy duty mixer and fit with dough hook
2) add the salt and the starter, continue combining at a low speed until dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl - 5 mins. or so
3) transfer the dough to a large bowl and cover with a kitchen towel and allow dough to rise 1 hour at room temperature
4) gently press down with fist on the dough to release air pockets
5) shape dough into 3 equal balls
6) cover, and let rise at room temperature until doubled in size
7) test by pressing two fingers gently into the dough
8) if indentations remain, the dough has risen completely
9) preheat oven to 425 or 450 degrees farenheit and place baking pan in bottom rack of oven
10) add water to create steam in on the baking tray that the baking pan is on
11) employing a sharp knife, slice 3 diagonal slits across the top of each loaf and and place the baking sheet with 2 loaves in oven
12) bake until deep brown and sound hollow when tapped about 1/2 hr. to 35 mins.
13) transfer t rack and place remaining loaves in oven
14) bake as the other loaves
15) let cool and enjoy
 
serve with extra virgin olive oil or creamy French style butter and have with a glass of wine, or café and / or cheese and wine ...
 
Enjoy,
Margaux.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 January 2013 at 14:22
Thanks, Margi.
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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 January 2013 at 14:52
Brook,
 
Let me know how it turns out ... and the details ... on the products you employ, the profile, your views etcetra ...
 
ENJOY,
Marge.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 11:18

Well, Margi, your bread is sitting on the cooling racks, and looks gorgeous. Can’t wait until they’re cool enough to taste.

I formed the dough into three shapes: a batard, an Epi, and a rather fancy boule with decorative ears.

I did modify your recipe to fit my procedure.

Probably the biggest change is that I use instant yeast, so adapted accordingly. And I cut back the salt to only a tablespoon.

The starter was essentially as you presented it, except for the change you and I discussed privately. That is, one cup of each flour, rather than the ½ cup your directions say. I mixed the flour and yeast and added it to the honey and water. I let it ferment at room temperature during the day, then put it in the fridge overnight.

For the finished dough I made a similar adaptation for the instant yeast. After rising I pressed it down, shaped the loaves, and placed them on baking sheets lined with parchment paper and sprinkled with semolina.

These were set to rise until doubled.

One difference is the baking temperature. I preheated to 500F. A tray with 2 cups water went in the bottom of the oven as it preheated. I then put the loaves in the oven for 2 minutes, sprayed three times at 30 second intervals to create more steam, then lowered the temperature to 450F for the balance of the baking time. Following my rule, I rotated the loaves halfway through the baking time.

Your recipe differs from the one I usually use in the amount of rye flour. Mine only uses a total of a half cup. I’m presuming yours will have that earthier flavor that comes from whole grain flours. We’ll know in an hour or so when they’re cooled.

But, if they taste half as good as they look, this is a real winner.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 11:31
Brook,
 
Wow ... the color of this bread is incredible, and the texture, is a true palate pleaser ... I am pleased to hear, that they are cooling ... and shall be shortly ready for a tasting !!! Wish I were there in KY for this ...
 
TOO BAD, U DO NOT HAVE A CAMERA ... We have to find a donater !!!
 
Always, Marge.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 13:28
And the verdict is: Fantastic!
 
I can see why you enjoy this bread so much. It's definately going on my regular list.
 
Thank you for sharing!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 13:43
Brook; I knew you and Barbara would truly enjoy a real Provence country home made bread !
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:11
   Thanks Margi, I'll give this recipe a whirl...I'm sure it'll be terrific!
 
     Have a great day!
  Dan
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:13
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

And the verdict is: Fantastic!
 
I can see why you enjoy this bread so much. It's definately going on my regular list.
 
Thank you for sharing!


  Brook, knowing what I know about you knowing what you know...that's quite a statement! LOL

   I can't wait to give this bread a try. 

  Thanks for your write-up!

Dan
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:38
Do try it Dan. It's a really good bread.
 
Next time I'm going to try it with a retarded fermentation of the dough, to see if we can make it even better.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:38
Dan. I had posted a photo of this provincial bread to show color and crust texture on Brook's Primer Series in Bread Section. The Baker who bakes this bread prepares round loaves as I have. Great compliment !
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:42
And you'll know you're good, Margi, when you can make the decorative slashes the way they appear in the pix. Clap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:51
Brook and Dan. This bread is absolutely spectacular. True Brook. The photo I found on a Frenc Blog is exactly how it looked while we pigged out in this tiny village ! Dan: please take photos as Brook did not unfortunately ! Thanks guys. Late here ... Buenas Noches. Marge.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 15:52
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

...try it with a retarded fermentation of the dough...


     Thumbs Up  great suggestion!

   Good night, Margi.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 16:05
Brook. Personally it is perfect as is. However, if you liked a fermented profile, then enjoy. I leave French perfection as is !    
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 January 2013 at 17:29
Margi, I believe we're having a problem with technical jargon.
 
All bread is fermented. That's what makes it what it is; the conversion, by yeast and enzymes, of carbohydrates into sugars, with carbon dioxide and alcohol as byproducts. If we were making an alcoholic drink, we'd recover the alcohol. Instead we let it evaporate. Meanwhile, the carbon dioxide gets trapped by a net made of gluten.
 
This is the process that takes place when you set the dough to rise.
 
When you add heat to the equation, the dough gelatinizes, permentantly assuming the form it took when fully risen.
 
Retarded fermentation is merely a way of slowing down the process, because the longer it takes for the yeast and enzymes to do their work the better the taste and texture of the bread.
 
For instance, rather than the starter, you could make this bread with a sponge. Instead of having 12 or more hours for the yeast to work, it would only be 20 minutes. And the bread would suffer. Don't get me wrong. You would still have a good loaf of bread; just not as good as it is with the starter.
 
All I'm suggesting is having the finished dough sit in the fridge overnight, to do the same thing. We're not souring it (as would be the case with a starter or dough sitting at room temperature for a lengthy time), merely expanding the time it takes to ferment.
 
In theory, retarding fermentation of the finished dough has the same effect as using a starter instead of a sponge. It takes a superior bread and makes it even better. Sometimes that difference is very apparent. Sometimes its barely perceivable.
 
That's what I want to find out.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 January 2013 at 00:14
Brook. Thanks for your exemplary detailed thorough eplanation. I know wines are aged / fermented in oak casks or barrels for varying periods of time. I just did not understand the use of word; now I do. There are 3 breads of millions that I am not a fan of; white, sour dough or Irish soda. I general, I love golden to darks & Italian and French rustic loaves and baguettes. Some Spanish varieties as well of course and focaccia and Greek breads. In my tiredness at midnight I had misunerstood. Thanks for clarifying. I have prepared this provincial perfect bread yearly since the recipe was given to us a few years ago ... it is laborious but well worth it ! As u stated fabulos or fanstastic ! TU. Marge.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 February 2013 at 06:20
Just discovered, this morning, that in addition to everything else, this bread makes an exemplary French toast.
 
I sliced it fairly thick, let it sit in a mixture of eggs, milk, salt, pepper, and nutmeg, then pan-fried it in butter. Delish!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 February 2013 at 09:39
Hey, everyone - I added the photo (that Margi is referring to) to the opening post - looks great!
 
Margi or Dan - the next time you make this, perhaps we can get a pictorial - I've nearly given up on seeing one from Brook! Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 February 2013 at 09:59
Scratch the "nearly" Ron. Can't post pix without a digital camera. Which I don't have.
 
Sorry.
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