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Oatmeal Pain De Mie

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 27 February 2012 at 07:28
Unlike most Americans, we like bread with a little body to it. So much so that oatmeal bread is one of our go-to sandwich loaves.
 
My Oatmeal Pain De Mie recipe is designed to go in a pullman loaf pan. If you don't have one of those, no sweat. Just use two standard (i.e., 1-pound) loaf pans.
 
Oatmeal Pain De Mie
 
22.5 oz bread flour
5.6 oz rolled oats
14.5 oz lukewarm milk
3 tbls butter, softened
4 tbls hoey
3 tsp instand yeast
2 tsp salt
 
Combine all the dry ingredients in a mixer bowl, using the paddle. Add the butter, milk, and honey, stirring until well combined. Switch to the dough hook and knead five minutes, adjusting flour or liquid as necessary. (if making this by hand, knead 8-10 minutes)
 
Turn dough out on a lightly greased work surface and French fold it. Transfer to an oiled bowl, cover with plastic film, and let sit 1 hour. French fold again and let rest 15 minutes.
 
Form dough into a log and transfer to a pain de mie (pullman) pan. Cover loosely with plastic film. Let dough rise until one inche from top, plut cover in place, and let rise another ten minutes.
 
Bake in preheated 350F oven for 35 minutes. Remove cover and if necessary let bake five minutes more to brown top crust and assure bread is cooked through. Internal temperature should be about 200F.
 
Transfer bread to a rack and let cool.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 20:01
i don't know how i missed this, but it sure looks good!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marissa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 20:11
I don't know why, but I don't like ordering things online. So I've been on the hunt for a pullman pan. I even live close to a Sur La Table (fancy kitchen gadget store) but they only carried the BOTTOM and you had to order the cover online.  ???? But I was there a few days ago and saw that they finally had the complete set, so of course I bought it. Got it home and found out it is some odd ball size, not the same one that every pan de mie recipe uses.  Sheesh.  So gonna return it.

I'm excited to try recipes like this once I get a real one...guess I'm just going to have to order it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 February 2012 at 21:21
I can't understand why anyone would sell just one part of a pan. Doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
 
There's no Sur La Table near me. But I've always heard good things about them; that they're all the things Williams Sonoma tries to be but isn't. So it's really surprising that they only sell half of a product.
 
Anyway, there are three "standard" sizes for pain de mie pans. The most used is the one we normally think of as standard: 4 x 4 x 13. It took me some experimenting, but that one works best with a dough weighing in at + or - 43 ounces. Obviously, this is the pan size I use.
 
There is also a mini pullman pan, that's about the size of a regular loaf pan, but with the sliding cover. And an oversized one that, IIRC, measures either 4 x 4 x 18 or 5 x 5 x 18.
 
I bought mine, on-line, a little more than a year ago, and have been very happy with it. But the ironic thing is I've never made a regular pain de mie bread. Instead, I've adapted other breads that we like---such as this oatmeal one---to pullman size.
 
In addition to the oatmeal, I've done pullman sized potato bread, Brioche, pretzel bread, and pumpkin bread. That last is a yeast bread, not the more common quick bread associated with pumpkin.
 
If you want to see what this bread is like, without a pullman pan, it will make two loaves in regular large loaf pans.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 February 2012 at 03:08
Originally posted by Marissa Marissa wrote:

I don't know why, but I don't like ordering things online. So I've been on the hunt for a pullman pan. I even live close to a Sur La Table (fancy kitchen gadget store) but they only carried the BOTTOM and you had to order the cover online.  ???? But I was there a few days ago and saw that they finally had the complete set, so of course I bought it. Got it home and found out it is some odd ball size, not the same one that every pan de mie recipe uses.  Sheesh.  So gonna return it.

I'm excited to try recipes like this once I get a real one...guess I'm just going to have to order it!

I can understand your hesitation in ordering online, it can be easy to get burned. Here is a link to an outfit I do business with quite often and I can vouch for their customer service and the quality of their products. They have an assortment of pullman pans at reasonable prices.

Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 February 2012 at 05:55
+1 on Fantes.
 
Although I agree about ordering on-line, sometimes it can't be helped. The trick is finding reliable companies. Fantes is certainly among them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marissa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 February 2012 at 07:59
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Anyway, there are three "standard" sizes for pain de mie pans. The most used is the one we normally think of as standard: 4 x 4 x 13. It took me some experimenting, but that one works best with a dough weighing in at + or - 43 ounces. Obviously, this is the pan size I use.
 
There is also a mini pullman pan, that's about the size of a regular loaf pan, but with the sliding cover. And an oversized one that, IIRC, measures either 4 x 4 x 18 or 5 x 5 x 18.

I think the one I bought is the mini loaf pan - I didn't even see that option on any of the online places I went until the Fantes link.  I'm sure I could adapt recipes to it, but it just seems so much easier to just get the full sized one (the 4 x 4 x 13) and start from there!

I'm going to check around the rest of the Fantes site and see what else I *need*.  Thanks for the tip!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 February 2012 at 09:26
Actually, with the mini you shouldn't have to do any adapting. It's the same as a regular loaf pan, only with the cover. So a regular dough recipe should work with it.
 
Don't know if yours came with instructions. If not, the procedure is this: Proof the dough. Make it into a cylinder that will fit the pan. So far this is no different than any loaf.
 
Let the dough rise until it's one-inch from the top of the pullman pan. Put the cover in place. Let set an additional 10 minutes. Bake.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marissa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 February 2012 at 09:45
Ah, but I have a whole section of a baking book for the big/standard pullman pan. I've made a few of the recipes in two regular loaf pans and I live it but I'm wanting to make some sandwich type bread so I want the big one!

But now I may keep the smaller one too. Besides, I'm terrible at returning things. It's been sitting in my car and I can never seem to make it back to the store! Ok, talked me into it. I'll have two new loaf pans!  :)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 February 2012 at 11:52
Which book is that, Marissa?
 
When I got my pan one of the biggest problems was finding recipes, other than the basic one. So I had to do a lot of experimenting and adapting.
 
Would have been nice to have had a running start.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marissa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2012 at 07:47
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Which book is that, Marissa?
 
When I got my pan one of the biggest problems was finding recipes, other than the basic one. So I had to do a lot of experimenting and adapting.
 
Would have been nice to have had a running start.

Bah, it's a book at the farm and I don't recall the name! But I do have one at home that has a pain de mie recipe in it. It's actually the best baking book I've ever had and the one I use 90% of the time these days. Baking Artisan Bread: 10 expert formulas for baking better bread at home by Ciril Hitz. It has a 'plain' one and a cinnamon swirl (same dough though).

It's the first book I've ever had that used weights for flour. Changed my baking so much! I don't know why Americans cling to volume measurements for things like this where weight makes so much more sense!
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