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My cheese is out of line!

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gonefishin View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 March 2013 at 19:16
On Cheese   

    Speaking only for myself, it can be so difficult keeping track of cheese.  Cheeses that I've tried quickly get blended in and soon enough forgotten.  Maybe it would be easier to keep track of what cheeses I've had, what I've liked, etc, if I was more knowledgeable on the subject. 

    So, I am planning to post some cheeses here to try and keep track of what I have had.  Please feel free to jump in and give your opinions...I wish I would have done this years ago!

   Dan
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2013 at 19:34
   No pictures of the plates, just a few of the cheese 


  Campo de Montalban





Parmigiano Reggiano




Brunet




  Reggiano is always a welcomed treat.  Yes, we have had it many times...and it never gets old.  The Brunet was really a joy, so glad I had the opportunity to try this cheese.  I'll certainly be getting this one again.  The Campo de Montablan was a little less impressive to me.  It wasn't a poorly crafted cheese by any means, not at all.  It was just a little one dimensional.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2013 at 19:43
Dan, one reference I find invaluable is the World Cheese Book (Juliet Harbutt, editor in chief, DK Publishing, 2009).
 
While by no means the definitive cheese guide, it's the one that I learned the most from. It provides tasting notes, history, geographic local, milk source, etc. for 750 cheeses from all over the world.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2013 at 19:50
   Thanks, the description sounds really good...I'll check it out.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2013 at 19:58
By the by, you might want to try Grana Padano. While Parmigiano Reggiano has gotten the lion's share of publicity, among Italian cheeses, Grana Padano is indistinguishable from Reggiano to most people.  But it's considerably less expensive.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2013 at 20:11
Something else to consider. As you develop your cheese preferences, see if there is a type that you prefer. Then look for others of that type.
 
Cheese are categorized several ways. One fairly common grouping is Fresh Cheeses, Aged Fresh Cheeses, Soft White Cheeses, Semi-Soft Cheeses, Hard Cheeses, Blue Cheeses, and Flavor Added Cheeses.
 
Within each category are sub-categories, in which the cheeses are defined by type of milk used, type of rind, how long it's been aged, etc.
 
Also keep in mind that the AOC, DOC, and PDO designations often refer to more than just geography. They sometimes include what the milk producers were fed and other factors which can effect flavor.
 
And you thought it was gonna be easy. Wink
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2013 at 20:36
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

By the by, you might want to try Grana Padano. While Parmigiano Reggiano has gotten the lion's share of publicity, among Italian cheeses, Grana Padano is indistinguishable from Reggiano to most people.  


   Hi Brook, great recommendation.  I have had Grana Padano, it is certainly a nice cheese...not indistinguishable from Reggiano...but a real nice cheese.


Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Something else to consider. As you develop your cheese preferences, see if there is a type that you prefer. Then look for others of that type.
 
Cheese are categorized several ways. One fairly common grouping is Fresh Cheeses, Aged Fresh Cheeses, Soft White Cheeses, Semi-Soft Cheeses, Hard Cheeses, Blue Cheeses, and Flavor Added Cheeses.
 
Within each category are sub-categories, in which the cheeses are defined by type of milk used, type of rind, how long it's been aged, etc.
 
Also keep in mind that the AOC, DOC, and PDO designations often refer to more than just geography. They sometimes include what the milk producers were fed and other factors which can effect flavor.
 
And you thought it was gonna be easy. Wink
 
 


   Over the years I've found I've come to real adore a very wide variety of cheeses.  I do crave nicely aged developed cheeses, but cannot discount a well crafted young cheese (which may be perhaps even harder to accomplish).  My wife, Cheri, is starting to open up to various blues, but this has been a process.  Soft, hard...semi-soft, etc, etc.  I also like some flavored cheeses, but I tend to gravitate toward the ones that really prove to be of good craft. 

   I will start paying more attention to labels, etc.  I find it interesting how even in raw milk cheeses, the taste can vary from very easy to "of the barn".  I can enjoy both...but never know what exactly I have in store for me if I pick a new cheese on milk type and process alone.  Luckily, nearly all the places near me let you sample the cheeses before you buy.

     It certainly is an interesting and fun area of the food world, but isn't it all. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2013 at 04:57
Good Morning, Dan.
 
Firstly, thanks much for your lovely feature on an array of assorted cheeses and the photos to accompany.
 
I am going to also recommend a book for you, and a few links on cheeses in English ...
 
Tomorrow I only work until 16.00 hours and thus, shall more time; to upload my Cheese Photos from Italia ... and the north of Spain ---
 
 
I am a true cheese-holic; and today for example, had a small Provoletta with grape tomato slices, red onion, Prosciutto di Parma strips and orégano herb fresh sprinkled ... Under broiler, 5 minutes; and divino divino ... 1 slice of warm fresh out of oven rustic country bread ---
 
That was meal 3 ... I eat small portions 5 x   a  day ... Next is mini green salad and then, fresh strawberries in season ---
 
I shall provide some of our fotos and an interesting anecdote about a young couple, who relocated from London to Cantabria, in northern Spain; and are producing their own CANATABRIAN BRIE cow variety cheese ... it was amazing; as they were introducing their product at Madrid Fusion.
 
They had given me a cheese to take home !!!  It did not last very long !!! Thumbs Up
 
We loved it --- very rich and creamy --- much creamier than imported French Brie !  French Brie is much creamier in NORMANDY, FRANCE !!!
 
I shall provide the fotos I took in January ---
 
Kind regards.
Marge.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2013 at 05:05
Brook and Dan,
 
Designations of origins, are much more than just a place; they represent the traditions, the character of the people, the celebrations, the history, the aromatics, the typography & geography, the history, the culture of a land and its people ...
 
I am pleased that the book, Brook recommends is on this wave length ! Big smile
 
Sounds like a lovely book selection too ... I believe I may have it --- I have so many books on cheese; need to make a list now ... what we have here in Madrid and what we have in Puglia ---
 
I also have another wonderful guide on cheeses ... I shall have to provide name later --- I do not remember exact title /  It covers The Mediterranean Cheeses of FRANCE, IBERIA, GREECE, ITALIA, MALTA, TURKEY and A few of the other European nations: Belgium, Switzerland, Austria, Holland, Ireland, UK, and --- Germany ---
 
 
THE SPANISH CHEESES: many Galician and Asturian cheeses are wrapped in leaves and left in caves to cure ( age ) ... the smoking process in Lugo, Galicia and Vitoria, Pais Vasco is still done in the traditional manner --- with logs ...
 
Thus, it is quite a tour gastronomically for lovers of cheese ...
 
 
Kind regards.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2013 at 08:54
I've been on a mizithra kick lately. It's a greek cheese, semi-soft, white, on the salty side, made from goat milk.

A simple sauce of browned butter with some mizithra and parmesan over noodles (typically I use farfalle or fettuccine), is fantastic. Can't get enough of it.

Anyway, I love just about all kinds of cheese. Not a huge fan of the blue cheeses, but other than that I really haven't met a cheese I didn't like.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2013 at 09:23
I wonder if different producers make it differently, Mike? I found mizithra to be rather bland and tasteless.
 
In your sauce, for instance, based on my experience the mizithra would provide a creaminess, and be a carrier for other ingredients. But the flavor is coming from the parmesan.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2013 at 09:51
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

I wonder if different producers make it differently, Mike? I found mizithra to be rather bland and tasteless.
 
In your sauce, for instance, based on my experience the mizithra would provide a creaminess, and be a carrier for other ingredients. But the flavor is coming from the parmesan.


I'm guessing so. After doing a bit of research this morning I'm thinking the stuff I have locally is aged mizithra. It's very salty compared to other cheeses, though beyond that and a sort of "creamy" flavor/texture, you're right there's not a whole lot of flavor to it. Still I enjoy snacking on it while I'm waiting for the butter to brown and the pasta to cook.

from wikipedia:
Quote Xynomyzithra (sour Myzithra) has a more acidic or sour flavor. It is created by rubbing fresh Mizithra with coarse salt and leaving it to age even more, usually hung in cloth bags again; the longer it ages, the denser, saltier, and more sour it becomes. It can ultimately turn into a very dense, hard, white cheese that is suitable for fine grating. Hard or dried Mizithra is also called anthotyro xero. It is often added to pasta and has a stronger flavor.


I'm guessing the stuff I get at the store is closer to the Xynomyzithra, though it's not sour or if it is the saltiness hides it. And it's not very hard. It's very soft and crumbly compared to other cheeses, though it is grate-able. I'll have to pick up another package and take a closer look at it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 March 2013 at 10:17
That's probably the difference. It's been awhile, but what I had was likely the fresh version.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2013 at 11:52
Dan,
 
This is aged cured Reggiano Parmesano ready for the plate  ... D.O. Parma, Emilia, Romagna ...
 
All one needs is the pasta, the oven warm bread and a good glass of red wine !
 
Great thread.
Margi.
 
 
Photo Courtesy: Margaux Cintrano.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 March 2013 at 14:48
Originally posted by Margi Cintrano Margi Cintrano wrote:

Dan,
 
This is aged cured Reggiano Parmesano ready for the plate  ... D.O. Parma, Emilia, Romagna ...
 
All one needs is the pasta, the oven warm bread and a good glass of red wine !
 
Great thread.
Margi.

 


   That is such a treat!  Permesano Reggiano is certainly a top example in its category, no doubt!  Wonderful picture
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 March 2013 at 08:48
It's not real easy to find here in the states but another favorite of mine is Leyden (sometimes spelled leiden).



It's a Dutch cows-milk cheese made with cumin seeds. Similar in taste and texture to Gouda (not the waxy, fake smoke flavored 'Smoked Gouda' you get in stores here) but the cumin seeds send it over the top.

My absolute favorite breakfast is a couple slices of toast with butter and leyden.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 April 2013 at 21:39
   Spanish Cheeses

Okay...time for some more cheeses.  I'm going to be making some paella tomorrow, so I figure I wanted to stay in the region of Spain with the Cheeses to follow dinner. 

  Queso de Cabra Garrotxa


queso Manchego el Trigal



Ibores raw goats milk cheese, Manchego 6month raw milk and Campo de Montalban cow/goat/sheep Cheese



  While I did taste them all before buying, I'll give them a better tasting tomorrow...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 April 2013 at 23:19
Dan. Thank you for sharing. Pleased to know Spain is exporting more cheeses to USA. I am a big fan of goat cheeses. Your Ewe milk Semi cured Manchego is young.
 
The tri mix is semi cured meaning not aged two years or 18 mos. I just bought somr cheeses from Canary Islands and Cadiz .. I will post photos at wkend. I am sure you shall enjoy your selection. Look forward to your tasting notes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 April 2013 at 06:54
Originally posted by Margi Cintrano Margi Cintrano wrote:

Dan. Thank you for sharing. Ppeased to know Spain is exporting more cheeses to USA. I am a big fan of goat cheeses. Your Ewe milk Semi cured Manchego is young. The tri mix is semi cured meaning not aged two years or 18 mos. I just bought somr cheeses from Canary Islands and Cadiz .. I will post photos at wkend. I am sure you shall enjoy your selection. Look forward to your tasting notes.



    The Manchego 6month is young, they had a variety of Manchego of different ages.  This particular Raw milk Manchego fell in nicely with the flavor profile of the other cheeses...I didn't want too similar of flavors competing.  Like I have mentioned before, I do like the deep complexity of a well aged cheese, but I am also starting to think making a complex young cheese may be more difficult.  We're lucky that we can get so many quality items from around the globe in this area.   But even with a very good selection of ingredients at our hands, I have not seen many Spanish cheeses that are aged 18month+ like I do for cheeses from other countries.  Even In Chicago...the Spanish cheeses you find are of quality and of origin (actually most are the same you find here), but they aren't well aged.


   Spanish Cheese Guide



 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 April 2013 at 07:43
That stands to reason, Dan. Odds are the cheesemongers by you and the ones in Chicago are using the same distributors. So there's a vast overlap in their offerings.

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