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cioppino

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 15 February 2010 at 12:58
from time-life: foods of the world: the great west, 1971
 
Quote cioppino, a highly seasoned seafood stew, is at it's best when made with a mixture of both finned- and shellfish. the version...here includes crabs, mussels, clams and cod steaks. white wine adds flavor to the broth, but cioppino is normally served wtih a red wine. san francisco sourdough bread is the classic accompaniment - good in itself and convenient for sopping up the last delicious drops of broth.
 
though the name cioppino sounds italian, and the savory blend of tomatoes, garlic, wine and herbs that give this fish stew its zest is reminiscent of mediterranean seafare, the word was actually coined in california - presumably by italian fishermen who settled in the state. the stew itself bears a family resemblance to both the cacciucco alla livornese of italy and the bouillabaisse of france. like its european cousins, cioppino is made with whatever fish or seafood is available. shrimp and even lobsters may be added; the mussles may be left out. any firm white-fleshed fish, such as halibut or sea bass, may take the place of the cod. live blue crabs may be substituted for the dungeness variety, but blue crabs are small and should be cooked whole rather than cut up as are the large pacific crabs.
 
 
to serve 8
 
fish stock
  • 2 lbs fish trimmings; the heads, tails and bones of any firm white-fleshed fish
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 large onion, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1 medium-sized bay leaf, crumbled
  • 6 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp salt

fish stew

  • 1/4 cup olive oil or vegetable oil
  • 1 cup coarsely-chopped onions
  • 1 tbsp finely-chopped garlic
  • 3 medium-sized firm ripe tomatoes, washed, coarsely chopped and pureed in a food mill, or substitute 1 cup canned pureed tomatoes
  • 1 cup dry, white wine
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
  • two 1.5-pound pre-cooked dungeness crabs, thoroughly defrosted if frozen
  • 3 dozen large  mussels in their shells
  • 2 dozen small hard-shell clams in their shells
  • 2 pounds fresh cod steaks, cut into 8 equal portions
  • 1/2 tsp salt

to prepare the fish stock, combine the fish trimmings and water in a 4- to 5-quart enameled or stainless steel pot and bring to a boil over high heat, skimming off the foam and scum that rise to the surface. add the coarsely chopped onion and the bay leaf, peppercorns and 1 tsp of salt, reduce the heat to low, and simmer partially covered for 20 minutes.

strain the contents of the pot through a fine sieve into a bowl, pressing down hard on the fish trimmings with the back of a spoon to extract all their juices. measure and reserve 4 cups of the fish stock.
 
wash the pot, add the oil and heat it over moderate heat until a light haze forms above it. add the cup of coarsely chopped onions and the garlic, and, stirring frequently, cook for about 5 minutes, until the onions are soft and translucent but not brown. stir in the reserved stock, the tomato puree, wine and parsley, and bring to a boil over high heat. reduce the heat and simmer partially covered for 15 minutes.
 
meanwhile, prepare the crabs. holding a crab tightly in one hand, lift off the top shell and discard it. pull out the spongy gray lungs, or "dead man's fingers," from each side and scrape out the intestines in the center. place the crab on its back and, with the point of a small sharp knife, pry off the pointed flap or apron. cut away the head just behind the eyes. with a cleaver or heavy knife, cut the crab into quarters. shell, clean and quarter the second crab in the same manner and set both sides on a plate.
 
under cold running water, scrub the mussles and clams thoroughly with a stiff brush or soapless steel-mesh scouring pad, and remove the black ropelike tufts from the mussles. season the cod on both sides with 1/2 tsp of salt. set the mussles and clams and the cod aside on wax paper or plates.
 
to assemple the cioppino, arrange the pieces of crab in the bottom of a 6- to 8-quart enameled casserole. lay the mussles and clams on top and pour in the tomato mixture. bring to a boil over high heat, reduce the heat to low, cover tightly and cook for 10 minutes. add the pieces of cod, cover the casserole again and continue to cook for 8 to 10 minutes longer. the cioppino is done when the mussel and clam shells have opened and the cod flakes easily when prodded gently with a fork. discard any mussles or clams that remain closed.
 
serve at once, directly from the casserole, or spoon the cod and shellfish into a large heated tureen and pour the broth over them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 February 2010 at 13:13
This is definitely a beautiful dish that sounds delicious. You all that live near the coast have a perfect source for the goods....we'll have to settle for what we can get. Very nice picture!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Montana Maddness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 February 2010 at 17:25
OK mouth watering now! Thumbs Up
Hotter the better bring on the peppers!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 February 2010 at 19:51
I LOVE cioppino!  My mom as a young woman worked at a then famous San Francisco restaurant Sabella's in the 50s located across the street from Fisherman's Wharf.  She knew sea food.  Though I grew up 90 miles away we would go to the city and I was introduced to cioppino.  The last two days of our honeymoon, my wife and I stayed 2 nights into San Francisco, and I introduced her to Cioppino, at Pier 9 restaurant on Fisherman's wharf, that was over 30 years ago, we were too broke and couldn't afford Sabella's across the street.  My mom is 84 and in Nov. I took her to San Francisco one last time to visit her mom and father's grave.  We went down to Fisherman's wharf she wanted to eat at the restaurant she once worked at.  The original Sabella's is now closed.  Across the street on Fisherman's wharf behind the crab stalls is a tourist version with the same name Sabella's owned by the original family.  Mom had fresh steamed cracked Dungeness Crab, you can guess what I had CIOPPINO!




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 June 2012 at 02:32
I love cioppino , i did a smoke cioppino one day and it come out great .i smoked the mussel and the shrimps . they say the word cioppion is from the Italian fisherman the each one chip in to the stew.

Ahron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 June 2012 at 11:10
Tas and Ahron,
 
Of course, do the fact that we live on the Mediterranean Sea, I would have quite a lovely selection of fresh shellfish, seafood and fish varieties ...
 
Lobster, Mussels, Clams, Crevettes ( huge Red Prawns called Carabineros ), White Andalusian Prawns, Dénia Red Shrimp --- I would use Seabass or Cod ... Squid ... Baby Octopus ...
 
Well, now that I have myself all worked up to make it, I shall look into it ... It is scant pickings, at moment for fish and shellfish. Our season is November to March ...
 
Have lovely Monday,
Margi.
 
  
 
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 June 2012 at 11:23
I just realized that I've got some mussels in the freezer, left over from my last paella. I don't think they are quite enough for the recipe, but I can make up for that with extra clams or perhaps another seafood.
 
I don't have a great selection where crab is concerned, but i am sure that some available substitute would be adequate. The flavour profile of this dish looks too good not to try, even if a substitution or two becomes necessary - and judging by the notes above, this dish is highly adaptable.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 June 2012 at 04:49
Tas and Ahron,
 
Most seasonal shellfish, fish and seafood works wonderfully with this delectable dish !
 
I would consider squid, clams, firm  firm white fish from the lakes, rivers or oceans ... and of course, any shrimp --- the bigger the better ! 
 
I put the Cioppino on top of a bed of  angel hair pasta !!!  Yum ... Yum ...
 
 
Star  This is to die for with a stunning Prosecco white sparkling wine or Cava or Lambrusco ...
 
 
Have a lovely Tuesday.
Ciao.
Kindest, Margi
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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